Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III Vs Sony A7III

The camera sensor affects the camera’s overall performance, like the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III Vs Sony A7III. These cameras use different sensors and are priced differently for different user types. Neither of these cameras is cheap and let’s see what the two can offer and which fits you best.

In this comparison, we will talk about the following:

  • What is a Camera Sensor
  • What are Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III
  • How is the Design of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III
  • What are the Camera Specs of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III
  • How is the Image Quality from Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III
  • How is the Autofocus Performance in Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III
  • How are the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III for Video
  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III Vs Sony A7III

Camera Sensor

Your digital camera has a sensor in place of the film in a more traditional film camera. The sensor is a core of a camera as it is the part that collects the incoming light from the lens. The camera captures light when the shutter opens and converts them into electrical signals, then translates it into colors matching the real-life image you see through the camera’s viewfinder. The sensor is responsible for determining the overall image quality and affecting elements like depth of field, resolution, dynamic range, and low-light performance.

About Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III

Camera sensors come in varying sizes, usually depending on the main device. Smartphones and typical bridge cameras like Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ80 Vs DMC-FZ70 use smaller sensors than mirrorless cameras like Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III. Bigger sensors generally produce higher image quality with everything equal, and it is also more expensive to make. Thus, cameras with bigger sensors also cost higher. Most mirrorless cameras use APS-C or Full-frame today, with Panasonic and Olympus still producing models with micro four-thirds options.

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III are a few options on a different edge because one is an MFT while the other uses a full-frame sensor. The price difference is expected because A7III costs twice the E-M5 Mark III despite this camera being an incredible choice in the price point. Those who consider these cameras are likely hybrid users who want to combine fantastic still image quality with reliable video recording because the two are similarly famous for this application.

The main difference between Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III is the sensor which primarily affects the still pictures such as resolution and low-light performance, which is generally better on cameras with a bigger sensor. The actual performance is similar, especially in the shooting experience. But, we prefer the E-M5 Mark III for hybrid users because its video recording experience is better, thanks to the interface. The price point also makes us favor this camera more unless you are pure on the photography side.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III Design

Like most mirrorless, these cameras are relatively compact and lightweight, but the build quality feels different. The A7III was launched a year earlier than E-M5 Mark III, so the company is moving forward in giving you more robust housing, especially the control dials and weather-sealed body. The main issue with A7III handling is its rear screen because it is touch-sensitive but only works to choose the focus rather than navigate the system. Both cameras have EVF with the exact 2.3M resolution, but E-M5 Mark III has a better-articulating screen.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III Camera Specs

Let’s see what the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III can offer, starting from the camera specs. As mentioned above, the main difference between the two is sensor size because E-M5 Mark III uses a micro four-thirds sensor, bigger than a one-inch and smaller than APS-C. This camera uses a 20MP sensor with ISO 200 – 25,600 or expandable to 64 – 25,600. The A7III is a full-frame camera with 24MP resolution and an ISO range from 100 – 51,200 or expandable to ISO 50 – 204,800. Read also: Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ80 Vs Sony HX400V.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III Image Quality

Regarding image quality, the significant difference between Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III is the sensor and pixel that translates into the details. A bigger sensor and more pixels on A7III generally give you better details, and Sony color processing is always on the “contrast” side, including the RAW format. The same difference is also apparent when shooting JPEG so expect the images from A7III to look sharper and crisper than E-M5 Mark III.

Another advantage of a bigger sensor is ISO performance because you can push it high on the A7III while maintaining a reasonable noise; Sony noise reduction is impressive. But, it doesn’t make the E-M5 Mark III a worse option just because it has a smaller sensor and fewer pixels. This camera is still excellent for photography and has features like Live Composite Capture, which many people have always loved about Olympus cameras.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III Autofocus

We also want to see the autofocus performance in Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III because it is crucial. The two combine contrast and phase detection, but A7III has 693 autofocus points, while E-M5 Mark III only has 121 points. Sony is always known for its autofocus performance, which is apparent with A7III because its tracking is on-point and the hit rate is almost 100% compared to E-M5 Mark III with varied results; most are still sharp, some are a bit blurry, and few are out of focus.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III Video

Lastly, we want to see the video recording from Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III. As for the image quality, A7III is better because its 4K is oversampled and has more resolution. These cameras are 8-bit, but the overall quality is impressive, and the lightweight body makes the two suit different applications, including vlogging, but the A7III doesn’t have an articulating screen. While the E-M5 Mark III has a Flat profile for color grading, the A7III has Log and HLG footage.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III Vs Sony A7III

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III and Sony A7III are some of the best cameras to consider, especially for hybrid users. But, the two are also different because the A7III is twice more expensive than the E-M5 Mark III for the bigger sensor and better autofocus. This camera also generally produces sharper and better pictures, but it is less convenient for hybrid users because of its tilting screen. The overall performance is equally impressive but build quality and handling are slightly better on E-M5 Mark III if you have small to medium-sized hands.

- 20MP live MOS sensor
- Portable, weather sealed design
- 121-point all-cross-type on-chip phase detection AF
- Compact, in-body 5-axis image stabilization (up to approx. 5.5 EV steps of compensation)
- Advanced 24.2MP BSI Full-frame Image Sensor w/ 1.8X readout speed Advanced 24.2MP Back-Illuminated 35mm Full-frame Image Sensor
- 15-stop dynamic range, 14-bit uncompressed RAW, ISO 50 to 204,800
- Up to 10fps Silent or Mechanical Shutter with AE/AF tracking
- 693 phase-detection / 425 contrast AF points w/ 93% image coverage

Conclusion

The decision is yours because we have different preferences. But, we recommend the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III because it offers a greater value for most people. This camera captures excellent images with Olympus shooting features, has reliable autofocus, and is versatile for hybrid users.

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